Evolv DNA Forum
Sign up Calendar Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment   Page 2 of 2      Prev   1   2
dwcraig1

Avatar / Picture

Administrator
Registered:
Posts: 1,248
Reply with quote  #16 
I'm surprised this wasn't mentioned before so here goes. I just checked my SDNA 75 again for mod resistance, not only was I wanting to see than it was still 0.002Ω but wanted to see how many digits the the right of the decimal point it reads and it's 3. So how did  DJSLB come up with ).0016Ω? Just something I was thinking about, perhaps he measured it with other means.
__________________
I am not connected with and do not represent Evolv Inc. All opinions are my own. They are just opinions and may not be correct.
ChunkyButt200

Avatar / Picture

Administrator
Registered:
Posts: 1,516
Reply with quote  #17 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dwcraig1
I'm surprised this wasn't mentioned before so here goes. I just checked my SDNA 75 again for mod resistance, not only was I wanting to see than it was still 0.002Ω but wanted to see how many digits the the right of the decimal point it reads and it's 3. So how did  DJSLB come up with ).0016Ω? Just something I was thinking about, perhaps he measured it with other means.
correct if i'm wrong but aren't you supposed to take 80% of what you see in AA and apply that number to the mod res field?

80% of 0.002 = 0.0016

i left mine at .0016 i don't have the tool or the ambition to make one with solder. you think a bolt with the correct threading would work?

__________________
1.21 JIGAWATTS............GREAT SCOTT!........WHAT THE HELL IS A JIGAWATT?
• I am not employed by nor do I represent Evolv Inc.  All opinions are my own, they are just opinion not fact and can be wrong •
Latest versions of EScribe: DNA 200 • DNA 75  Common problems
EVOLV HELP DESK - https://helpdesk.evolvapor.com/?a=add
LOST VAPE WARRANTY REPAIR - http://www.lostvaperepaircenter.com
mactavish

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 127
Reply with quote  #18 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dwcraig1
I'm surprised this wasn't mentioned before so here goes. I just checked my SDNA 75 again for mod resistance, not only was I wanting to see than it was still 0.002Ω but wanted to see how many digits the the right of the decimal point it reads and it's 3. So how did  DJSLB come up with ).0016Ω? Just something I was thinking about, perhaps he measured it with other means.


In his latest video, he has moved, and made a new office. It's a long winded video, no devices reviewed, but he does reverse the camera and show some of the tools he uses. I don't recall anything specific like a scope, but I was not paying 100% attention. Take a look at it if you have time, perhaps you can pick up on it. He does briefly point out his heat sync devices. I noticed these on his desk as at one point as I was considering buying them. They are used to get all the case thermal numbers. Not that costly, and there is a thread on here where one of the mods discusses them, just too limited for me as a single use tool.
mactavish

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 127
Reply with quote  #19 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChunkyButt200
correct if i'm wrong but aren't you supposed to take 80% or what you see in AA and apply that number to the mod res field?

80% of 20 = 16 


Not if you use the 99% copper plug. You use the actual ohms you see on the screen. Look earlier in this thread as I put the link to the original discussion.
ChunkyButt200

Avatar / Picture

Administrator
Registered:
Posts: 1,516
Reply with quote  #20 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mactavish
Not if you use the 99% copper plug. You use the actual ohms you see on the screen. Look earlier in this thread as I put the link to the original discussion.
this is part of a quote from a post from James on mod resistance calibration......

"(2) Always make sure the Mod Resistance you have is conservative -- keep the value you enter at or lower than the real Mod Resistance. If the value you enter is higher than the real ModResistance of the device, it can negatively affect the stability of the temperature protection system. It's best to measure it if you can, honestly. And then use, say, 80% of that value to give yourself some margin.

Having a fairly accurate Mod Resistance will deliver a more accurate power and temperature.
The compensation is really only notable in extremely low Ohm coils where the 510's resistance is significant though."

here's the link to what i quoted....

https://evolvapor.forumchitchat.com/post/mod-resistance-7522239?trail=15&highlight=mod+resistance

__________________
1.21 JIGAWATTS............GREAT SCOTT!........WHAT THE HELL IS A JIGAWATT?
• I am not employed by nor do I represent Evolv Inc.  All opinions are my own, they are just opinion not fact and can be wrong •
Latest versions of EScribe: DNA 200 • DNA 75  Common problems
EVOLV HELP DESK - https://helpdesk.evolvapor.com/?a=add
LOST VAPE WARRANTY REPAIR - http://www.lostvaperepaircenter.com
Lilpetabread

Junior Member
Registered:
Posts: 28
Reply with quote  #21 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChunkyButt200
this is part of a quote from a post from James on mod resistance calibration......

"(2) Always make sure the Mod Resistance you have is conservative -- keep the value you enter at or lower than the real Mod Resistance. If the value you enter is higher than the real ModResistance of the device, it can negatively affect the stability of the temperature protection system. It's best to measure it if you can, honestly. And then use, say, 80% of that value to give yourself some margin.

Having a fairly accurate Mod Resistance will deliver a more accurate power and temperature.
The compensation is really only notable in extremely low Ohm coils where the 510's resistance is significant though."

here's the link to what i quoted....

https://evolvapor.forumchitchat.com/post/mod-resistance-7522239?trail=15&highlight=mod+resistance


From what I have read, this is only true if you're using an RDA with copper wire, due to the the fact that the RDA itself has a resistance. By subtracting 20% of the final Mod Resistance value, you're subtracting the RDA's potential added resistance.

On the other hand, using the copper plug - you use the full Mod Resistance value due to the fact that there is no other resistance taken into account, as the plug isn't threaded into something like an RDA that would raise the final Mod Resistance value. I hope that makes sense!
dwcraig1

Avatar / Picture

Administrator
Registered:
Posts: 1,248
Reply with quote  #22 
^^^^true but still might how the ).0016Ω came to be.
__________________
I am not connected with and do not represent Evolv Inc. All opinions are my own. They are just opinions and may not be correct.
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.